It can be supposed that Anko can now pass as one of the Japanese staples these days.  Anko is a sweet paste made from zauki beans. Although on their own, Azuki beans are sweet, but they are still commonly sweetened with sugar or honey.

The appearance of the azuki beans make it difficult to be imagined that it would give a whole lot of influence to the Japanese culture. And, besides the fact that even before sugar cane or processed sugar was able to make its way to the country of Japan, Anko being used as an ingredient for every dessert makes it even harder for us to imagine how. But, believe it or not, these Anko traditions still continue up to these days. Well-known Anko sweets or desserts include:

 

anpan

Anpan

A sweet bun that is filled with anko.


Daifuku_1

Daifuku

These are mochi stuffed with anko.


ichigo-daifuku

Ichigo Daifuku

Anko filled mochi with whole strawberry.


anmitsu

Anmitsu

This is a bowl of agar jelly with anko and fruits varieties such as peach, mikan, cherries and pineapple. This is commonly served with sweet black syrup in a small pot beside it. Ice cream is also added.


hanami_dango

Dango

Flour dumplings that can be topped with anko.


dorayaki12

Dorayaki

If you are familiar with Doraemon, you are probably with this. These are two castella pancakes that is filled with anko.


1024px-Carinto_manjyu

Manju

Anko filled with steamed cakes.


Oshiruko

Oshiruko

Oshiruko—anko soup with mochi. Oshiruko is also processed in a can as a juice and as a chocolate bar.


taiyaki

Taiyaki

Fish-shaped cakes that filled with anko. Taiyaki is one of the most popular festival foods in Japan.


Anko Toast

Anko Toast

Favorite breakfast in Nagoya, and is available at most cafes all throughout Japan.


Yokan

Yokan

Thick jellied anko that traditionally serves as dessert.

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